Using the leaves of coffee plant

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Using the leaves of coffee plant

Using the leaves of coffee plant : Using the leaves of coffee plant receive the least amount of attention considering all the sections of the plant. The beans, which are actually seeds located within little fruits on the bush, are one of the most expensive commodities on the planet, right up there with crude oil; they’re normally roasted and ground for our daily drinks. The coffee plant’s fruit, which is usually called cherries, are edible, and their dried husks can be used to make a beverage called cascara. The leaves, on the other hand, are frequently overlooked.

This is beginning to change. A minor trend appears to be brewing around “the coffee leaf tea,” despite it isn’t actually tea. The waxy, dark green leaves, one of the most expensive commodities on the planet, are dried in the sun before being lightly toasted, a process similar to that used in the production of some green teas. The coffee plant’s fruit has some fairly astounding health advantages when brewed like tea: no caffeine and a ton of antioxidants. The leaves of coffee provide a revenue stream for growers.

Check out the Latest coffee tips on the coffeemag.ca : Five proper tips for grinding coffee beans

Where the name of the coffee leaf tea comes from?

The coffee leaf tea isn’t tea because the word “tea” refers to a plant called Camellia sinensis, one of the most expensive commodities on the planet, not a category of dried leaves steeped in hot water. True tea is created from the leaves of this plant, which come in three colors: black, green, and white. The colors are caused by the leaves being collected at different stages, but largely by varied curing procedures. The leaves of coffee provide a revenue stream for growers.

Why coffee leaf is a superfood in more ways than one

  • It’s made from coffee, yet it tastes like tea!

Our Hawaiian Ola tea is the first ready-to-drink coffee beverage derived from the leaves rather than the coffee plant’s fruit. We steep organic Kona coffee leaves to make a light-caffeinated infusion that tastes like classic iced tea. Even if you don’t like brewed coffee, these refreshing coffee leaf teas are sure to please.

Using the leaves of coffee plant

  • It’s up to you whether you want a little caffeine or a lot

The coffee leaf tea, one of the most expensive commodities on the planet, provide a revenue stream for growers. It comes in two varieties, each with a distinct percentage of naturally occurring caffeine. Our Lemongrass Mint coffee leaf tea provides 60 mg of caffeine per 11.5 ounce can, which is less than half of what you’d get in a cup of brewed coffee. In addition, our Tulsi Berry coffee leaf tea contains 120 mg of caffeine per can, which is slightly less than brewed coffee. It’s entirely up to you whether you want a little pick-me-up or a little more!

  • Antioxidants in abundance!

Green tea and conventional brewed coffee are not as high in antioxidants as the coffee leaf tea. Mangiferin, a compound found in coffee leaves, is being researched for its many potential health advantages. It’s like giving your body a big hug from the inside when you sip our coffee leaf tea. It is good to know that the leaves of coffee provide a revenue stream for growers.

  • Aids coffee farmers and encourages them to practice sustainable growing

We’re on a mission to help Hawaii’s environment and economy, and one of the most significant ways we achieve so is through the ingredients we utilize, which create demand for organic, ethically cultivated crops. We pay local organic coffee farmers for leaves that they cut as part of their natural growing process for our coffee leaf teas. As a result, in addition to the coffee plant’s fruit, the leaves of coffee provide a revenue stream for growers.

  • Non-GMO confirmed, vegan, gluten-free, and vegan!

No animal-derived sweeteners are used in our coffee leaf teas, which are delicately sweetened with organic cane sugar. They’re completely gluten-free and vegan! They’re organic, and the Non-GMO Project, an independent certifier leading the campaign for GMO disclosure in packaged food and drink, has validated them.

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